Elements of Comparative Constitutional Law

Term: 
Fall
Credits: 
3.0
Course Description: 

This course will look at the basic methodologies, notions and institutions of comparative constitutional law. Core issues and key concepts that will be analysed by using examples from some of the main constitutional systems around the world are inter alia: presence or absence of a written constitution, different forms of parliamentarianism, separation of powers and the related issue of checks and balances, constitution making, different existing models of constitutional courts and judicial review, procedural issues of judicial review (standing, admissibility, direct or indirect individual complaint mechanisms), examples of substantive constitutional rights, vertical or horizontal effect of constitutional decisions and constitutional rights in multi-level systems of protection.

Learning Outcomes: 

Ability to think critically at a basic level.

Ability to understand the range of constitutional models of major jurisdictions – basic level.

Ability to demonstrate knowledge of constitutional law in major jurisdictions – basic level.

Ability to benefit from a substantial knowledge of constitutional law in major jurisdictions via a comparative perspective – basic level.

Ability to use legal reasoning – basic level.

Ability to use cases and precedents in legal reasoning.

Assessment: 

The final grade is based on class participation [10%], a mid-term exam [40%] and a written final take home exam [50%].